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Hello and welcome to the movie blog of author John DeFrank - FilmZ and Guy Sobriquet Malone - Researcher

Operation: Finale Mini-Review


Operation: Finale mini-review by FilmZ

A comment to Holocaust deniers out there: it happened.  Find any legitimate history source, and a late chapter will include Adolph Eichmann.  This fact tasks Operation: Finale with a responsibility: The burden of history is on the filmmakers to earn credibility through accuracy.  Hey, you want to throw in a love subplot, OK, but just a little; and make sure you explain why El Al balked at helping Mossad.  Yet, at the same time, a film has to, as they say, put butts in seats, so the challenge is to make it exciting and fresh, especially a story that has been filmed several times in the past.  O:F succeeds, for the most part.  It is a procedural spy/crime story that starts with a chance meeting that leads to a leak, which sparks a mission that breaks international law, some ill-timed snafus, and ends with an international trial of the century.  Great films will find a way to still bring tension and anticipation to familiar material.  That is the main problem with O:F: while we learn particulars of the mission and are reminded why it is important, we rarely get a sense of tension or urgency.

Ben Kingsley plays a soft-spoken, taciturn Eichmann--as he evidently was, in reality.  Historically correct, but not Hollywood-effect; some might prefer the "Architect of the Final Solution" to be larger than life.  Credit and blame Matthew Orton's script.  His Mossad pursuers are led by Rafi Eitan (Nick Kroll), but the focus here is on Peter Malkin (Oscar Isaac).  He carries the emotional weight of his beloved sister having been murdered by Nazis, yet he is the one who gets what he wants by connecting on a human level with Eichmann.  Other methods are considered, up to and including murder, but this is also a morality tale, with the balance of empathy and sociopathy struck in the conversations between Malkin and Eichmann.  The team also includes, among others, Dr. Hanna Elian (Melanie Laurent), and ethical anesthetist; Isser Harel (Lior Raz), a government facilitator.

The story gets rolling when Klaus Eichmann (Joe Alwyn) tries to impress young Sylvia (Haley Lu Richardson), boasting that his father was a big deal during WWII.  This comes on their first date when Klaus takes Sylvia to a Nazi rally in then-Fascist Argentina.  Frightened, the half -Jewish girl runs out and tells her father (Peter Strauss).  Word travels to post-War Germany and on to Israel.  And the game is on: how will Mossad forces spirit Eichmann out of a hostile nation and bring him to justice?  Director Chris Weitz delivers an involving if not compelling story, and, although there are action scenes this is not an action film, even the suspenseful escape at the airport pales in tension to a similar scene in Argo.  Still, an excellent cast delivers an intriguing story depicting an important page in 20th Century history.
7.5 out of 10 on an Entertainment Scale
7.0 out of 10 on an Artistic Scale

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