RSS

Hello and welcome to the movie blog of author John DeFrank - FilmZ and Guy Sobriquet Malone - Researcher

Ad Astra


Ad Astra -- a review by Guy S. Malone, Researcher

Writer-Director James Grey's films seem to resonate with critics better than they do with audiences.  We have a hypothesis, at least with regard to Ad Astra and Lost City of Z, his most recent previous movie: the former is science fiction adventure, the latter is a historical Indiana Jones-style adventure flick.  That's what we, as movie-goers expected.  What we got were moody, meditative dramas of existential quests that have some intense action set pieces.  We say this not to criticize Gray; we merely want to prepare our friends who intend to see the film.

We open in the indeterminate future where astronaut Roy McBride (Brad Pitt) is working on a towering space antenna when an intensive power surge hits, damaging the tower and hurtling him to Earth.  After miraculously surviving, Roy is called to a secret meeting where he is told that the surge was just the beginning is a series of events that threaten life in the solar system.  More, it is emanating from Neptune, in the area where Roy's father, legendary space pioneer H. Clifford McBride (Tommy Lee Jones) was lost and presumed dead in an expedition aimed at contacting extra-terrestrial life.  The space agency believes Roy's father is alive and has knowledge of the surges.  Roy is tasked with going to the Moon and then Mars--where there is equipment capable of communicating with Neptune--and sending a message to his father, pleading for contact.  This dredges up a well of feelings in Roy--abandonment, isolation, the inability to connect--so his journey is not only one of discovery but also of the soul.  Along the way, we meet Roy's estranged wife (Liv Tyler); Thomas Pruitt (Donald Sutherland), Clifford's old associate who holds a key to the mystery, Helen Lantos (Ruth Negga), a planetary administrator on Mars whose parents died at the hands of Cliff McBride; and various others.  Roy narrates, so we learn his inner voyage as the mission moves onward to outer space to discover the secret of whether Clifford McBride is hero or villain, and if Roy can stop the life-threatening power surges.

One can be forgiven if Ad Astra invokes an aura of 2001: A Space Odyssey meets Apocalypse Now.  Comparisons are obvious.  The stunning images Hoyte Van Hoytema provides, along with the sedate but eerie soundtrack by Max Richter immediately invoke Kubrick's film, even as Pitt's meditative narration and the quest itself derive from Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness, which begat Apocalypse Now.  Gray's and co-writer Ethan Gross's vision of the future, replete with bureaucratic machinations, invasive bio-psychological probing, and exploration that marries the efforts of capitalism and science are thought-provoking and set up much of the dramatic tension.  An excellent cast is largely wasted in roles that could have been played by any competent actor.  There has been talk of multiple Oscar nominations, especially for the film itself and Brad Pitt,  The belief here is that Ad Astra is so subdued and leisurely-paced, and that it has been released so early in the Oscar season, that it will leave no indelible marks to be remembered by the awards voters come January. 
7.5 out of 10
 
Free WordPress Themes Presented by EZwpthemes.
Bloggerized by Miss Dothy